The Daily Dish: Bread is the Devil

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I have a confession:  after yesterday’s biscuit nirvana, I didn’t feel well.  Even though the meal was vegan and lowfat and technically “healthy,” it wasn’t good for me.  You see, white flour and I don’t get along.   We have a long history, a complicated relationship full of temptation, indulgence and inevitable guilt.  I can’t just have one bite, or one biscuit..one slice of Italian bread, one cup of pasta.  One leads to two which leads to an empty bread basket and a giant tummy ache.  I have tried & tried over the years to break up with Mr. White Flour, knowing that we are not good for each other, but somehow he pulls me back in.

So, I did some deep thinking and some soul searching.  Though I know lots of people can, and do, enjoy pastas and breads on a plant-based diet, I’m simply not one of them.  Maybe someday I can tip my toe in, perhaps flirt with whole grain varieties and my beloved Ezekiel bread, but for now I’m going cold turkey.  I’m leaving you,  Mr. Dough Boy.  Cute as you are, we are simply not right for each other.  Please don’t tempt me any longer, don’t invade my dreams with fluffy biscuits and crunchy French bread.  Just leave me alone, ok?  Because there’s a new guy in town, and he is named John McDougall, MD.  He’s taking me on a date, promises me a good time without tummy aches, guilt and remorse.  This new adventure is one I’ve been on before, and it was good.  I lost weight, I had more energy, I was content.  I was healthy, in body and mind.  He even has a side kick, Dr. Neal Barnard, and they are going to help me reach my goals, for once and for all.

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For the next month I’m challenging myself to a whole foods, plant-based, no oil, no processed foods way of eating,  ala The Maximum Weight Loss Diet.  I’ll be using all of the MWL-compliant recipes I can find, along with some from Dr. Barnard and colleagues.  I’m going to follow the program as closely as I can, but I’m admitting right now that I will likely have an occasional glass of wine, and my morning coffee is not negotiable.  Progress, not perfection, as they say.

I hope you’ll follow along with me, would love the support and camaraderie! I’ll pop in later with my weekly menu, am going to pore over a few cookbooks and websites for a little while.

Have a wonderful day!

Note: My daughter Kristyn designed the dough boy devil graphic years ago, isn’t he adorable?!

Thrifty Thursday: Homemade Vegetable Broth

I became an avid nutrition label reader after going vegan, and even more so when I went oil-free. I was shocked to discover just how much oil is sneaked into the most unlikely of places! Vegetable broth, for example. Many of us rely on pre-packaged cans or boxes of broth, or we use those bouillon cubes. They’re convenient, right? Well, that convenience comes at a cost, not just monetarily but also nutritionally. So many of those innocent-looking cubes contain oil, corn syrup and other scary ingredients. 

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Why? Your guess is as good as mine, but I see no reason to put up with that when I can make my own fat-free, sugar-free broth with minimal effort and expense. Guess what? You can, too!

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First, you’re gonna want to gather up your veggie scraps. You know, the little bits & pieces of fresh vegetables that would normally get tossed in the trash. Carrot & onion peels, celery leaves, pepper tops, etc. Whatever is left over after preparing your meal, with the exception of salad greens because they don’t freeze well. I also avoid cabbage, kale, broccoli and other strong-tasting (and smelling) vegetables, but that’s just me. Dump these into your container, pop in the freezer and keep adding until it’s full. Now you’re ready to make broth!

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I rely on my Instant Pot for this purpose because it’s fast and easy, but you can also use a slow cooker or even stovetop method. The process is the same: dump the veggies into the pot, cover with water and cook until a nice rich broth appears.  (Times vary, but I did forty minutes in my Instant Pot because I wanted a very rich, dark broth. I’ve read that it can be made in as little as five!) If you want to get fancy, you can add some seasonings but since I’m using this as a base for future recipes, I don’t want any conflicting spices.

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Once it’s cooled down enough to handle, strain your vegetables over a large pot. (Some people put pasta strainers right into the Instant Pot, gonna try that next time!)

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Discard or compost the vegetables, then pour broth into jars or containers for storage. I got about 8 cups of broth.

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I used some immediately for a soup recipe, and the rest I poured into ice cube trays and froze. When I need a little bit of liquid for sauteing vegetables, I just pop one of these out and use in place of oil! So much healthier, right?!

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So, there you have it. Gorgeous, fat-free vegetable broth made from plain old water and stuff  you’d have tossed out into the trash. Frugal, eco-friendly and much tastier than anything you’d find on the grocer’s shelf.  Don’t you feel proud of yourself? I sure do!

Michele