The Daily Dish: Beef(less) Stew for Sunday Supper

I’m originally a Midwestern girl, born in Ohio but relocated to Florida when I was just a tot. My mother grew up in the hills of West Virginia, the daughter of a coal miner and a homemaker who struggled to clothe and feed five children on meager income, making a home in the “sticks,” as Mom called it. She called herself a hillbilly, and was proud of it, so I carry on that pride. Grandma was famous for saying, “We may be poor but we’re clean;” she kept her tiny rental house spic & span and was known for being a phenomenal cook. She was able to whip up a meal with whatever scraps of food were on hand, nobody ever went hungry at her table. In fact, my bio dad claims it was Grandma’s cooking that won him over, falling in love with her cooking before he did my gorgeous mama!

Grandma & Grandpa Smith, late 1960’s
Mom, before Me
Grandma & Me, 1967

My mother was not a particularly adventurous cook, better known for her baked goods than anything else, but we had a homecooked dinner on the table every night, even though she worked a full time job outside the home. It was the 70’s, so meat was the center piece of the meal. I know the menus well; when I turned old enough (about 12 or so) I took over the nightly cooking, giving mom a much-needed break. Baked chicken. Baked pork chops. Tuna casserole. On the weekends, there was grilled steak and the dreaded Sunday Pot Roast. Oh, how I hated that roast! I’d push the pieces around on my plate, trying to hide them under a pile of mashed potatoes, but Mom always caught me. She didn’t make me clean my plate, but I at least had to force down a couple of bites. I swear, that plate of beef is the reason I became a vegetarian! But, I digress.

Me & Mom, 1972

When the weather turned chilly (by Florida standards, this means below 75 degrees!) Mom would make a big pot of chili or beef stew and we’d “eat off” that all weekend long. Ooh, there was nothing like taking a slab of white bread and dunking it into a bowl of chili or stew! Simple comfort food, that’s a Midwestern diet.

Mom continued making her “famous” beef stew for many years; all of my girls have fond memories of sitting around Grandma’s table with a loaf of bread and a big bowl of soup. Even as vegetarians, they would pick out the pieces of beef and just eat the veggies, not willing to give up that taste and experience!

Now that mom is gone, and I’m a vegan, I have been searching for the closest facsimile to Mom’s. Dad has passed along the original “recipe,” of course, but I’ve never been able to replicate it. I pretty much gave up, thinking we’d all have to settle for a stew-less life, and then this happened..

My daughter Kristyn alerted me to this recipe, and therefore the blog where it’s posted. I must’ve been living under a rock, how is it that I’m just now discovering the Shannons? I love all things vintage and have actually modernized a few retro recipes on my other blog, but these folks took it to a whole new level, tackling the sacred Betty Crocker! A noble effort, with wonderful results!

This version is not quite the same as Mom’s; hers wasn’t as savory/spicy as the Shannon’s, but it’s close enough. I think that Mom were here she’d give it her seal of approval.

Beefless Stew

I made a couple of changes using what I had on hand; I substituted a bag of frozen mixed vegetables for the peas, and also left out the olive oil. I would definitely not prepare this without the creole seasoning as it adds a very nice punch without being too spicy. At the risk of sounding sexist, I must tell you that this is a very “man-friendly” recipe, a hearty dish that is sure to please even the biggest appetite! It’s a favorite of my omnivore hunny who swears that had I not told him, he wouldn’t know it was vegan.

Again, you can find the recipe over at the Shannon’s blog, along with some other wonderful dishes!

Note: I follow a WFPBNO (whole food, plant-based, no oil) diet 90% of the time, allowing for a bit of oil here & there when dining out or when I just want a little treat.  When the recipe calls for oil, I substitute vegetable broth or plain water when appropriate. This recipe does contain a meat substitute and since I limit my amount of processed foods we make this one of those occasional indulgences.

Have a wonderful day!

P.S. This is a re-post from my other blog, with a couple of updates/revisions.


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